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AD&D vs. 5E: It’s a Harsher World Out There

07 Mar

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons players moving into D&D, 5th Edition might think that because their characters are beefed up in 5E, the usual adventurer-fodder of orcs, kobolds, and goblins would be even more of a pushover in 5E.

Not so.

Take your average orc. AD&D orcs had one hit die for 1-8 hit points. Orc guards had 11 hit points, and chieftains had 13-16 hit points. Most weapons are going to be able to kill your average orc in one swing. Guards and chiefs lasted a little bit longer. AD&D orcs inflicted 1-6 points of damage, or by weapon type. They had no other special abilities or talents not even guards or chieftains. The experience point value for beating one was 10+1/hp.

Orcs in 5E have 2d8+6 hit points, making them tougher off the bat, or maybe the ‘mace’ in this world. They are normally armed with a great axe, inflicting 1d12+3 damage. Ordinary orcs have two special abilities. The have the Intimidation skill at +2, which is rolled when attempting to influence anybody through “overt threats, hostile actions, and physical violence”. (5E Player’s Handbook, p.179) (This would be rolled versus NPCs.) They are also Aggressive, and can move faster than you would expect under normal circumstances. Orcs normally move thirty feet in a turn. As a bonus action, which is a free action in addition to its regular action, it can move an additional thirty feet towards an opponent it can see. I have seen this play out interestingly in games. The player said “I honestly didn’t think he could get to me there.” Oops. The experience point value for beating a 5E orc is 100.

Orc war chiefs are even tougher. They have 11d8+44 hit points. (Yes. You read that right. An average one will have 88 hit points.) They are also Aggressive. They have Intimidation +5. They also get multi-attacks, giving them two attacks per turn with a melee weapon. Once per day, they can also Battle Cry. “Each creature of the war chief’s choice that is within thirty feet of it, can hear it, and is not already affected by Battle Cry gain advantage on attack rolls until the start of the war chief’s next turn. The war chief can then make one attack as a bonus action.” (5E Monster Manual, p.246) The experience point value for beating an orc war chief is 1100. (I would imagine that this is so high because they are never encountered alone, but are always surrounded by a good sized band of orcs and are a force multiplier.)

Orcs in 5E are more Tolkien-ish than cartoon-ish.

These improved abilities apply to other creatures as well. Goblins have Nimble Escape, which means they can disengage from a melee without triggering an opportunity attack against them. Hobgoblins have Martial Advantage. They train to work together as a fighting team. Once per turn, they can inflict an extra 2d6 damage if their target is within five feet of a hobgoblin ally. Bugbears have Brute (one extra dice of damage for the weapon used in melee attacks—a morning star that normally does 1d8 damage does 2d8 in the hands of a bugbear) and Surprise Attack (surprised targets take an extra 2d6 damage from an attack). Yes, if you are surprised by a bugbear and he lands his blow, you are taking 2d8+2d6 damage. Even lowly kobolds now have 3d6-3 hit points and Pack Attack, giving them advantage on attack rolls if they have an ally within at least five feet of their target.

And if that is not enough for sadistic creative Dungeon Masters, you can give ‘special creatures’ abilities that player characters might have. Fighters in my group were really beating up on creatures with their Second Wind and Action Surge abilities. Then they met a band of orcs whose leader, while not technically a ‘war chief’, had maximum hit points for an orc plus the same Second Wind and Action Surge they had been using to run roughshod over poor monsters. Boy, where they surprised!

In all, 5E monsters really are new and improved over their AD&D counterparts—and they come with more surprises!

*Creature statistics are from Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Dungeon Masters Guide (TSR; 6th printing, January, 1980), and Dungeons & Dragons, 5th Edition Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast; 1st printing, September, 2014).

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